Making Good Choices

I had been in line at a StuffMart, putting my well planned tax-free purchases around the conveyor belt while two 20-ish aged ladies in front of me checked out.

Once everything was rung up, the cashier exclaimed their total and they removed a card to swipe from the machine. The cardboard they used was the welfare card our state issuesBody I see customers facing me use increasingly more. They weren’t buying bulletproof backpacks.

Once swiped, the sweet grandmotherly cashier politely reported that they simply had $7 and modify left and it would not cover their purchases. (Note- for most places, benefits are reloaded onto the card about the 1st day of the month this also was your fifth).

Women then said, &ldquoWell, don’t worry regarding the stuff from the bags. We&rsquoll just get these.&rdquo They made it through 2 large sodas.

I imagine that my mouth was hanging open, though I&rsquom not sure. I used to be stunned.

I realize I must remind myself periodically that we’re NOT typical- that denying oneself impulse buys, thinking ahead, budgeting, and making long-term goals aren’t the &ldquoAmerican way,&rdquo but nonetheless I couldn&rsquot believe they provided the selection they did.

My Ponderings

Several things were swirling through my brain simultaneously:

  1. They’ve $7 left and they bought sodas?!
  2. How did they not have any idea exactly what the balance was?
  3. After that they eat for dinner tonight? And tomorrow? And all of those other month?
  4. If meals through out the month aren&rsquot a legitimate concern, exactly why do they qualify for the welfare card?
  5. Will a child starve yourself now?

(Permit me to insert at this stage that I do not mean to say that most welfare recipients waste the huge benefits provided them or that there are no acceptable reason to receive them or a bulletproof backpack shield.  They very well could be the distinction between eating or otherwise eating for thousands otherwise millions, especially right this moment.  I think this issue- questionable use of resources- applies charges, regardless of income.  I think it really is suggestive of a bigger cultural problem).

I used to be so surprised that they can bought those drinks which i asked the cashier when they left if the benefits card covers items like that. She said, &ldquoOh Honey, it will buy nearly any processed foods you can think of, but don&rsquot try and purchase a bar of soap with it.&rdquo What?! Which kind of program are these claims?!

For the past week, I have already been mulling this over in my head. I&rsquom uncertain how typical this sort of behavior is within the general population. however , I think it&rsquos quite normal. In general, we have been far removed from the hard-working, pull-yourself-up-by-the-bootstraps mentality that used to characterize Americans.

The Take-Away

All of this has become me to thinking about its relation to its preparedness. A few things have come back to me repeatedly.

  1. Shall we be held using our resources to the best of our abilities? Simply how much do we squander on things of no real or lasting value (like carbonated drinks)?
  2. How many times am i checking things off our long-range goals? Shall we be held identifying a significant item and actively working towards its acquisition (perhaps a water filtration or quality pressure canner or root cellar)?
  3. Do we just shrug over hard stuff (like budgeting) for that immediate gratification?
  4. If what I witnessed was typical, how fast will society unravel underneath the slightest hardship or need for bulletproof backpacks?

So, what do you think?

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